Monthly Archives: December 2014

Orwell

Socialists don’t believe in fun http://www.orwell.ru/library/articles/socialists/english/e_fun

Politics and the english language

 

This business of making people conscious of what is happening outside their own small circle is one of the major problems of our time, and a new literary technique will have to be evolved to meet it. Considering that the people of this country are not having a very comfortable time, you can’t perhaps, blame them for being somewhat callous about suffering elsewhere, but the remarkable thing is the extent to which they manage to be unaware of it. Tales of starvation, ruined cities, concentration camps, mass deportations, homeless refugees, persecuted Jews — all this is received with a sort of incurious surprise, as though such things had never been heard of but at the same time were not particularly interesting. The now-familiar photographs of skeleton-like children make very little impression. As time goes on and the horrors pile up, the mind seems to secrete a sort of self-protecting ignorance which needs a harder and harder shock to pierce it, just as the body will become immunised to a drug and require bigger and bigger doses.

-George Orwell, “As I Please,” The Tribune (17 January 1947)

Banksy, on Advertising

banksy-on-advertising

The thing I hate the most about advertising is that it attracts all the bright, creative and ambitious young people, leaving us mainly with the slow and self-obsessed to become our artists. Modern art is a disaster area. Never in the field of human history has so much been used by so many to say so little.

The above quote is a fantastic bit of polarization. It’s genius marketing, even if Banksy claims to eschew marketing. The fact is that the man (or woman?) is a marketing mastermind, with a very clear sense of what his brand is, and what his audience is. He knows how to pick a fight, to make himself and his views relevant.

Relevant reading:

 

 

1000 blogpost ideas

1000 blogpost ideas. There may be a few repeats.

0
1
2
10
13
24
30
69
365
911
1000
1337
10000
00s
1d
1st
2010s
2020s
2nd
3d
3rd
48laws
4chan
50s
50shades
50thlaw
60s
70s
80s
90s
a
AA
aaaaba
abbatoir
ability
able
about
above
acknowledgements
act
add
ads
affiliate
africa
after
again
agency
agile
agony
aint
alcohol
aliens
alpha
amazon
amazon
ambassador
america
analogy
analysis
anarchy
angry
anxiety
appendix
apple
apps
ariely
armchaircritic
art
artisinal asswipes
asics
ask
assholes
assumptions
astroninja
atkins
atoms
attention
audacity
authentic
autobots
automagic
automatic
automation
awareness
awe
b2b
babies
bamf
banksy
barbarian
barbell
barbie
bargain
basic
baudrillard
be
beach
beatlemania
beatles
beauty-standards
because
behavior
belief
benjamin-franklin (bf?)
berger
betrayal
bezos
bias
bible
bibliography
bieber
bigotry
bikini
billion
birds
bitcoin
black
black-swan
blackfriday
bling
blizzard
blockchain
bloggers
bold
bollywood
bones
bonobos
books
booty
bootylicious
bradbury
brains
bras
brave
brevity
britney
broadcast
brontosaurus
bulletjournal
bullshit
burningman
buzzfeed
cable
cadence
caesar-advertorial
cafes
campbell
candy
canine
cantaloupe
carlin
cartography
catharsis
cause-and-effect
celebrity
change (people want who they are)
channel drift
china
chocolate
chomsky
christianity
christmas
chubbies
cialdini
cigarette
circles
cities
class
classical
climax
clocks
clothes
cluetrain
cmv
cockblock
coffee
colbert
cold
cold-press-juice-cleansers
columbus
comics
commitment
communication
complex
compounding
conditions
contact
contagious
content
context
controversy
converse
coolstorybro
cosmos
countersignalling
cowboy
crazy
credit-cards
crises
crossfit
crowdfunding
crowdsource
culture
cunt
curate
customer
cyborgs
dalai-lama
danger
darling
davinci
death
decay
deceit
defenestrate
delegate
delete
democracy
dennett
derp
derrida
design
desire
desire-paths
detroit
diamonds
dichter
dictionary
different
digital
dinosaur
direct-response
discography
disgust
disney
disruption
doc-martens
dragons
drama
dream
dropbox
Drucker
drucker
drugs
drugs
duck
dylan
dynasty
earth
eat
echo
ecommerce
economics
education
elaboration
electricity
electrode
electrons
elon
elvis
emma
empire
encyclopedia
enemy
energy
engagement
engineering
ennui
eskimo
esquire
essayist
essays
estimate
estimations
etymology
evaporative
evernote
everything
evolution
exclusivity
execution
exercise
experience
experiment
extension
eye
fable
face
facebook
faculty
fails
fakegrimlock
fame
family
fantasy
fashion
fb
fear
febreze
feedback-loop
feels
feminism
feminism
fictional-pigs
fight-club
finite
fish
follower
FOMO
force
ford
forest
fractal marketing
franchises
free
french
friend
frills
frustration
fuck
fun
funny
future
g-string
gaga
galileo
game
game-theory
games-people-play
gamification
gandhi
gangnam
gasoline
gay
gender
genre
german
GG
girl
girl-next-door
gisele
gladwell
glasshole
gluten-free
gmail
gmaps
god
god (usually capt)
godfather
godin
goldieblox
goldieblox
google
gossip
gotmilk
government
gq
gratitude
greene
growth
growth
growthhacking
gta
guacamole
guerrilla
guestbook
guilt
guitar
gun
hacking
haha
hairstyles
halitosis
halo
happiness
harrypotter
hashtag
hate
haters
heatdeath
heavymetal
heirarchy
help
heresy
hero
heroin
heuristics
hicks
highest-order-bit
himym
hipsters
hiring
history
hitler
hn
ho
holiday
hollywood
holocaust
honesty
honesty
hope
horse
hot
houdini
humanity
hyperbolic-discounting
hyperreal
hypocrisy
hypotheses
hysterical
i (usually cap)
ibm
icecream
icymi
ideas
ideavirus
identity
igloo
ignorance
ikea
ikr
imagine
imho
imperfections
imply
important
inbound
incentives
inception
index
india
industry
infer
inherently-funny-words
innovation
insanely-great
insight
inspires
instagram
instantly
intelligence
intercourse
interest
interest-rates
internal-combustion-engine
internet
interrobang
ipad
iphone
irony
irregardless
itch
jabberwocky
jacobs
japan
jazz
jeans
jenga
jesus
jewelry
jihad
jimi
jingle
jiro
jobs
jordan
journalism
joy
joyfear
jumanji
k
kahneman
kaizen
kale
kanban
kanye
kardashian
kesha
keyboard-warrior
kim
kinesthetic
kinky
kiss
kittens
kleon
knickers
knnbccb
know
kodak
kouros
kraken
kriegspiel
kthxbye
ladyboner
lamest-edit-wars
lana-del-rey
langleav
language
language
launch
leadership
lean
learning
legitimacy
lego
lennon
letterman
leverage
lgbt
lies
life
life-cycle
lightbulb
limitations
linkedin
listerine
literacy
literally
lobsters
Lois
lol
lolcats
lolita
lord
lord-of-war
lost illusions
lotr
louboutins
loud
love
loyalty
luxury
machiavelli
made-to-stick
madmen
magazines
magic
magnet
magnitiude
makeup
mama
management
manifestation
map
marilyn
marketing
marlboro
marriage
mars
marvel
marvel
mary-kay
maslow
mateusz
mathematics
matrix
mcdojos
mcdonalds
mcleod
mcluhan
meaning
media
medium
meme
memory
mental-health
message
messiness
meta
metaphor
metcalfe
methodology
metricsystem
mickeymouse
micro
middle east
mine
misconceptions
mission
mlk
MMA
moist
monalisa
money
money
mono-no-aware
montaigne
mood
moon
motivation
mtv
multiply
music
mvp
myspace
mystery
name
narcotics
nations
naughty
navy
nazi
nebula
necessary
neckties
neither
networking
neurons
new
news
newsjacking
nexus
nickelback
nike
nipples
noise
nolan
nomanclature
none
nostupidquestions
nothingarian
novelty
nuance
nyc
nyt
obama
obscurity
ocean
offer
office
Ogilvy
old
olsen
omfg
omg
ooda
open
opposite
orgasm
original
orthodoxy
orwell
osama
oscillation
otaku
overestimation
oxygen
oxymoron
ozzy
p2p
p90x
pacman
pain
paleo
pamphleteer
panic
paparazzi
paradigm-shift
paramore
pareto
passion
passwords
pausch
pavlov
pay
paycheck
paypal
penis
perfection
performance
permanent beta
persistence
personal
personality
peta
PG
philosophy
photography
phrontistery
piercings
pikachu
pilates
pinnochio
piracy
pirate
pizza
planning
plausible-deniability
play
pluto
pmf
poetry
pokemon
poker
policy
ponzi
poop
pope
porn
positioning
postits
ppc
PR
press
pretty
prettywoman
priming
print
process
procrastination
product
promise
proof
prostitution
prude
psychology
pumpkin spice latte
punk
purplecow
queen
quest
question
question
quiet
quizzify
quora
race
racism
radio
radio
rape
ratchet
rationality
read
real
reason
recalibrate
receive
reclaim
recycling
reddit
referralcandy
referrals
regulations
relationships
religion
remember
reporting
resistance
respect
responsive
results
retard
reviews
rewards
ribbonfarm
rich
road
rock
rockefeller
rome
rose
royalty
rudolph
rules
safety
sagan
sale
santa
satan
satisfaction
schelling point
school
school
science
scifi
second
secret
segmentation
segway
selling
semantics
seo
seriously
set
sex
sex-ed
sharing
sharkjump
ship
shop
shopify
shortcut
signalling
silva
silver
simcity
simple
simpsons
sitnskinny
sivers
sixpack-abs
skill
skype
slang
sleep
slow
slut
smartphones
social
socialjustice
solar
soliloquy
spoilers
sports
spotify
SRK
stage
starbucks
startups
startups
statement
statistics
status
stickiness
story
storytelling
streisand
stupidity
style
submit
subtract
subway
success
suddenly
sufficient
suicide
superman
supermodels
suzuki
swag
switch
symbol
sync
synergy
system
tabloids
taboos
taleb
talent
talk
taste
tattoos
tea
teaching
techne
technology
tempo
terms-and-conditions
tesla
tetris
tferriss
thank-you
the
theater
thinking
thought-catalog
throat
tiffany’s
tigerwoods
time
toilet
tonyhawk
toyota
transceive
transhumanism
transit
transmit
travel
tree
triage
trypophobia
tulips
tumblr
tumeric
turpentine
turtle
tv
twilight
twitter
typography
u2
under construction
underestimation
underwear
unfair
union
unless
up up down down left right left right b a start
uplifting
uranus
urbanlegends
urgent
us
usp
v
vagabond
vagary
vagina
value
vanderbilt
veblen
vegan
verify
vgr
vibrator
video-games
village
villain
violence
violin
viralvideos
virginity
vision
visual
visualization
voice
voldemort
volkswagen
voltaire
vs
vuvuzela
wabisabi
wade
war
warcraft
warhol
watches
watches
water
watergate
watergate
wave
wealth
website
weddings
weird-al
westboro
westwing
whatever
whatsapp
white
whitehouse
whore
wiggle
wiki
win-win
windows
winning
wisdom
wololo
wonderwall
words
words
wut
x-factor
x-men
x-ray
xerxes
xkcd
xxx
yankeedoodle
year
yearn
yes
ynab
yoga
yolo
you
youtube
za
zag
zeppelin
zero-sum
zig
zimmer
zipf
zombie
zoo
zygote
zymurgy
zyzzyva
zzz

Stop spamming your blog at people

http://www.reddit.com/r/marketing/comments/2q80e3/am_i_the_only_one_sick_of_the_blog_posts/

Self-promotion isn’t inherently a bad thing. But it’s very shitty when somebody goes to a community and just drops their blog link.

It’s not obvious if one person does it, but once you have more than a few people doing it, the communal pool gets polluted, people get frustrated and they start to leave.

And eventually whatever marketing community you tried to set up ends up becoming filled with nothing but blogspam.

The way out of this, in my opinion, isn’t to ban linking to blogposts altogether. You can’t eliminate self-interest from the equation. If people aren’t allowed to link to their blogposts in one space, they’ll go somewhere else.

The way out is to have community standards where everyone is expected to contribute to the conversation.

I’ve posted links to blogposts to reddit several times, and have had them do quite well. The trick to doing this is to make the blogpost an afterthought, and to focus instead on contributing to the community space. You do this by sharing enough of the content in the community itself. On reddit this means summarizing your blogpost, your findings, etc – so that anybody who doesn’t want to read your blogpost is still able to get some value from the post.

I also recommend leaving comments with questions, and with your personal thoughts, what got you writing the blogpost to begin with, what you grappled with, what you’re uncertain about, what the next steps might be. And engage with people in the comments.

David Attenborough narrates Louis Armstrong’s Wonderful World for BBC

Everything is a remix.

David Attenborough is famous for his narration.

Everybody is familiar with Louis Armstrong’s What A Wonderful World.

Getting Attenborough to narrate Armstrong’s work is a simple but powerful idea. It’s so obvious on hindsight.

My takeaway here is- don’t ever seek to be original. Instead, attempt to make a remix that’s delightfully unexpected and yet powerful and compelling in execution.

I think you gotta think in first principles for this. “What is David Attenborough narrating?” “Oh, about the world.” “Is there anything cool about the world?” “It’s wonderful.. what a wonderful world~…”

As David Ogilvy said, make your thinking as funny as possible.

David Ogilvy

Confessions of an Advertising Man is one of the best books I’ve ever read. It took me a long time to get around to reading it. I always assumed that he would be an annoying, unlikeable person. I’m not sure why. I guess I had a negative impression of advertising in general, and I assumed that anything so popular (I’ve heard loads of copywriters and writers praise Ogilvy to the heavens) must be trash.

I was so wrong.

I put together 8 of his best-selling headlines in a blogpost for ReferralCandy.

 

Uber’s Six Personas

If you spend some time on Uber’s landing page, you get a pretty good sense of their various target personas.

1: Moving People (generic proposition)uber-moving-people

2: Getting More (convenience- working moms?)uber-getting-more

3: Treating yourself (impress your date)

uber-treating-yourself

4: Owning The Moment (feel like a boss + impress your network)uber-owning-the-moment

5: Sharing Experiences (impress your friends)uber-sharing-experiences

6: Creating Escapes (get away, you busy CEO you)

uber-creating-escapes

Read about Uber’s Mission Statement or about how Uber has grown over the years.

In Praise of Airbnb’s Marketing

I think Airbnb is doing great things with it’s marketing. It’s selling a new idea: Hospitality. It sells travel, it sells an experience that presents itself as something outside our current range of known options. Go home, everywhere.

It sells something that isn’t ubiquitous yet, isn’t common sense yet. And that makes a lot of sense to me. You can’t fight hotels by trying to be another hotel. You have to sell a different experience altogether.

I also find it interesting to study Airbnb’s blog. It’s influencing my thoughts about what to do with ReferralCandy’s blog in 2015 and beyond. Pay attention to the categories- Hospitality, Local Lens, Wanderlust, Stories, News, Events. There’s a lot of personality in that. Blogposts include things like “STUDYING ABROAD: why you should do it (and how to make it happen)“.

They also have a design blog (designairs.com) and an engineering blog (nerds.airbnb.com). When you get as large as a company like Airbnb, the main thing that influences your longevity and survival is probably the quality of your hires. So having these blogs allows Airbnb to market itself to its potential hires.

Here’s a comment I left on HN when they first changed their logo:

I don’t find many people who share my view on this, but I think this is a good move and that they should hold their frame. I think the logo is simple and memorable, and it transcends language limitations. The genitalia jokes will persist for a while, but eventually it will probably just mean “Airbnb.”

I also like the Belong Anywhere idea. I think it’s a nice touch of branding, I think it helps them to self-select a certain kind of host and a certain kind of traveller, and that can make all the difference. I’m eager to see how they grow and develop as a cultural force in the world.

Faces on Cars, by negative_commentary [reddit]

http://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/2qapdo/this_car_is_a_robot_in_disguise/cn4nd1u

[–]negative_commentary 109 points

All cars have faces on the front and back.

People make emotional decisions about buying cars. They buy cars whose fascias represent their own disposition.

Angry people buy cars with angry faces (Lexus, Maserati, BMW).

The reason most luxury cars tend to have angry or snooty faces is because market research has established that angry and snooty people tend to be more financially successful.

Mean people are more focussed on personal success while nice people take the needs of others into account more often and are less likely to be promoted to management.

Passive people buy cars with neutral faces (Toyta, Ford, Chrysler).

In the past passive people bought cars that had very few options but these days the incoming millennials market has an expectation from riding in their parents’ cars of luxury options, so cheaper cars are starting to come out with more features, because if your car is cheap but doesn’t have more options millennials will go to a competitor whose car has one more feature than yours.

Happy people buy smiling cars (Fiat, Miata, Nissan and the Honda Fit, for example).

Sports cars usually have aggressive, angry faces because people associate that sort of expression with rapid motion.

Wealthy people buy daily driver cars whose fascias have facial features that they associate with a particular social class.

Recent Lexus and Mercedes cars, for example, have a pinched cheek look that gives the appearance of high cheek bones, a trait that media influences people to believe is associated with good breeding.

They buy these cars because they want to associate with people who are like them. Their desire to be with people like them influences them to buy cars whose faces look like the people they associate with success and wealth.

Economy cars are often designed to look slow, cheap and to have resigned facial expressions because people who buy those cars tend to be slow, cheap and resigned.

People who do not respond to car faces buy cars their parents thought were cool, or owned when they were kids.

That’s why when you have a generation gap you see a lot of throwback cars like the new Dodge Challenger, Mustang, SRT Hellcat, Mini and Fiat 500 (I bought a Fiat 500 Abarth because my parents had a Fiat when I was a kid and because my dad was always fond of muscle cars).

Dr. Krishn A. Goyal with A. Sadasivam wrote an interesting paper about emotional vs. rational car buying that you can read here[1] . Warning: PDF

[–]negative_commentary 11 points

I already covered muscle cars, but I’ll elaborate a little.

Today all cars are muscle cars, even the cheap little Nissan Versa (which is an outstanding car for its price and even outdoes cars that cost a lot more in terms of utility and fun).

Today, every car you buy has fuel injection and a high compression ratio because the materials and processes we have created for internal combustion engines has improved discernibly since the Vietnam war.

You see, after the war, America was hungry to move on, and to fuel that drive to grow and thrive car companies had to begin offering cars that were not just big (the main value people had looked for in cars before) they also had to be fuel efficient because of fuel shortages, they had to be safe because the Boomers were, of course, making lots of babies and they had to be reliable, because people were carpooling and taking public transportation more than ever and if a car broke down people were more likely to catch a ride with someone or take public transportation than to buy a new car, because cars were very expensive. So for the first time Americans started demanding that the car they bought would prove to be reliable and the car companies were willing to meet that need because it was beneficial to both Americans and the car companies themselves.

Unfortunately for American car companies, all through the war companies from Japan like Nissan, Honda and Datsun had been developing cheap, inefficient cars already and were just waiting for Americans to end their occupation in Vietnam and move on so they could bring those cars to the US. There’s a fascinating documentary about how Japanese cars came to America and how the Japanese car companies defeated the stigma of Japanese cars that you can watch here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J66DeBxfr6Y

American car companies knew this so they launched a back-handed marketing campaign to fool Americans into believing that inexpensive Japanese cars were unsafe and unreliable.

That’s why in the 80s and even into the early 90s you’d hear people talking about how Japanese cars were crap even though they offered the best safety and fuel economy with unbeatable reliability that could only be bested by Volkswagen and Volvo.

Volkswagen has always had a hard time with American buyers though because they have difficulty with balancing functionality with style. To Germans, style and functionality often go hand in hand, but for Americans, symbolism and body shape are incredibly important when making a major purchase. The boxy shape of most of VW’s cars in the 80s and 90s gave Honda and other Japanese manufacturers with their smooth, flowing lines a distinct advantage with American buyers once there were plenty of Japanese cars on the road for a few years to prove that the cars were safe, economical and reliable despite Big Steel’s naysaying.

Now that you know a brief history of how cheap cars came to the US, it’s important to know that the demand for a better engine comes hand in hand with the demand for a better car. We’re always demanding a little more horsepower for a little less money (cost of the car and fuel both withstanding). That’s why even the most basic economy cars often come with engines that top out over 90 horsepower. Even the little Nissan Versa we discussed earlier has 109 horsepower.

So what makes a muscle car a muscle car?

Believe it or not, it’s not horsepower. In fact, in terms of performance, horsepower matters very little. The idea of a muscle car is a little skewed because it defines a specific type of car that does not necessarily perform better than other cars. The cars that really perform are called “performance cars.”

Lets make a small comparison:

The 2015 Boss 302 Mustang is a muscle car. It has three purposes in life:

  1. Smoke tires.
  2. Make a bunch of manly noise.
  3. Look aggressive and hateful so no one will think you’re queer, because if you want to wear your wife’s camisole just to try it on and see if it fits that’s not gay it’s called being curious.

The Boss 302 is a muscle car, not a performance car, even though Ford calls it a performance car because all of the money goes into those three things. It is a set of testicles on wheels. But if you get it up to 90 and throw it into a turn it’s going to keep going straight and so are you. That’s called understeer and it happens because all of the money went into smoking tires and not looking queer. There’s no money left for suspension and even if there were lowered cars are for queers. So you have to keep that ride height high. banjo riff

The 2015 Lancer Evolution is a performance car. It makes noise but it doesn’t sound like it’s gargling badgers. Its lines are aggressive but it doesn’t look like it’s trying to compensate for a bunch of Chris Brown CD’s stashed under the visor. It doesn’t smoke tires, it puts that power to the ground. It handles like a dream. It goes around corners like it’s bent at a 90 degree angle. You can get it up to 90 miles an hour and go “ah fuck it I just decided I want to turn right” and then do that, and the car will sort everything out and make sure you get home to kiss your wife when it’s all over. Many call the Evo a heartless, emotionless, computer controlled monster because like a hound dog it will do what you want it to without making you look bad over, and over, and over, all day long, and feel great about it.

Now, take out your Nissan Versa and take it for a spin, but drive it like a sports car. It will body roll nauseatingly into corners but the tires will break free just at the right time to save your ass. If you know what you’re doing and you drive a Nissan Versa fast you’ll have a lot of fun because driving a slow car fast is just as fun as driving a fast car fast and in some cases it’s even more fun. Sure, it doesn’t make a bunch of snarling noise, it doesn’t rotate the tires in conflict with the pavement but it doesn’t care that you only used your gym membership once to find out that you don’t actually know how to lift, broh. And I’ll tell you the big secret about economy cars. This is why economy cars today feel peppy and lively. It’s because all of the acceleration comes in the first 20% of the accelerator tip-in. What this means to you and me is that when the accelerator is pressed 1/5 of the way to the floor, you’ve technically got it floored. Pushing the pedal down further does nothing until you hit that little bump at the bottom that kicks you down a gear.

Speaking of which, using that little bump is not a bad thing. Anytime you want a little extra oomph, smirk to yourself (the smirking is important) and go ahead and push the accelerator down until it clicks. It’s called a kickdown and it’s not an accident, it’s there for you to use anytime you want. You can punch that kickdown and rev the shit out of an economy car and you’ll find you get onto the freeway with more confidence and make left turns with more confidence than ever before. Just let out of it before you get more than 1000RPM into the redline and don’t keep it there for longer than a few seconds. Think of the kickdown as your superman button. You wouldn’t expect Superman to make your coffee for you.

Muscle cars don’t have that kind of tip in. You push a little, you get a little. You push a lot, you get a lot. They’re designed to emulate the way carborated engines worked where you manually operated a set of butterflies and pumps that controlled the fuel/air mix directly. But like every other car on the market today, muscle cars are also operated entirely electronically. When you push the gas pedal, whether it’s an economy car or a Lancer Evolution, you’re just adjusting a volume knob that tells the car’s computer (the ECU) how fast you want to go.

Every car, even muscle cars, are designed so the car goes how fast you want it and goes the direction you point the steering wheel. The car actually compensates and points itself in the direction you want to go based on how you point the wheel and not based on the actual position of the wheel. It does this by varying the amount of effort required to turn the steering wheel, thus very subtly convincing you to turn the wheel a little more or a little less, kind of like your dad holding the wheel and keeping you on the road when you were learning to drive.

So to sum things up, what really separates muscle cars from other cars is how they look, sound and deliver power. I don’t want to say that muscle cars are designed for insecure people, but muscle cars are designed for insecure people, and if you drive on and you’re insecure that’s fine because everybody buys cars for emotional reasons and they’re all bad reasons.

[–]negative_commentary 10 points

The reason pedophiles drive inconspicuous vehicles is because they start by fantasizing privately, usually about a specific individual. Then they move on to photographing and observing children in public places. Over time they get a little closer to the children and they begin to rationalize their potential actions in their heads. They drive inconspicuous cars so that people won’t remember seeing them at those locations and become suspicious. Eventually their fantasy escalates to the point that simply watching children isn’t arousing anymore, and they rationalize that kidnapping one child will prevent them from molesting others, and they perform a kidnapping.

If you are interested in how the whole mental process works there’s a book called “A Stolen Life” by a woman who was abducted as a child and had the thought process explained to her several times during her captivity.

She explains very well what goes down and why pedophiles all prettymuch exhibit the same behavioral patterns and escalation.

[–]negative_commentary 8 points

Buying a car is a large decision and if a car is too different from what you’re familiar with you’ll buy a car that has a more familiar design even if its value proposition is far worse.

There’s nothing more that computer modeling or engineering can do to make consumer vehicles more aerodynamic and still retain the shape that consumers expect a car to have.

Car body designs are pre-modeled at least ten years in advance. One of the ways car companies adapt consumers to future car designs is by releasing them as toys. If you look back at Hot Wheels designs from the 90s the “futuristic” models look a lot like the cars consumers buy today.

You also have to consider functionality and and safety standards.

You can’t have body panels that have extreme angles because the angles create points of weakness. You also can’t have panels that have overhangs or underhangs because they don’t provide adequate crumple zones in crashes.

The exception is exotic cars. They have different, specialized safety mechanisms that are both very expensive and very advanced, and the panels often use exotic materials that are also very expensive and very advanced.

Case in point: Consumer cars have big, chunky bumpers made out of plastic because underneath the plastic is a layer of styrofoam that is required to be a certain thickness, because styrofoam is incredible at absorbing impact from pedestrians. We actually design cars so that when we hit people they’ll be less likely to take on a critical injury.

The impact to the car is channelled through the body panels into the frame of the car. The front of the frame is designed to crumple in and push the engine beneath the passenger compartment on rails so it will slide beneath the occupants rather than ending up in their lap. Because of this the body panels have to have sufficient surface area to distribute and channel the impact into the frame.

The frame, in turn, channels the energy into the A pillars. Those are the two pillars at the left and right of the windshield. That is why those pillars are so thick and block your view when you turn. It was decided it was better to partially block your view for the safety gain of channeling energy toward the back of the car and away from your face. This stops the steering wheel and dash from smashing into your face and allows the airbag to function.

People who complain abut the lack of a telescopic steering wheel will realize based on this that the reason you can’t adjust the length of the steering column to better suit your comfort is that the steering wheel has to be a minimum distance from your body to prevent the airbag from crushing your face into the back of your skull. Airbags deploy with a force of several hundred PSI and faster than the speed of sound.

That might have been a little long winded, but all of those things are integrated into why aerodynamics interplays with structure in cars.

 

[–]negative_commentary 7 points

dont see why Nike has to charge $100+ for a shirt that cost $10 to make.

Yes, the base materials cost $10.

But you also have to figure in the following, all of which cost money:

  • Research and development
  • Advertising
  • Donations to charities
  • Product support salaries
  • Management salaries
  • Health care and other benefits for employees
  • Quality testing

Counterfeit companies get away with this by overworking and underemploying while providing no benefits.

They also often steal the materials and machinery they need to produce their products from legitimate factories.

[–]negative_commentary 5 points

No there are very few people who do my job because it requires an ability to communicate with a complete objectivity.

Most people are heavily influenced by culture, mass media marketing, religion or past negative experiences.

My job is a job for psychopaths (literally people with neural psychopathy, not scary-movie psychopaths).

Some examples of other neuro psychopathics you may know of include Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla; Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon and the former Steve Jobs of Apple.

These are individuals who can perform their job with a complete lack of emotional influence and that is why they are successful at their jobs.

The reason I am so successful at my job is because of my total objectivity and my choice to not be a CEO, investor or hedge fund manager.

People of my type who do not choose one of those jobs are very rare because for someone without emotional influence those jobs are the fastest way to power and money, and those are the two things neuro psychopaths work for, because nothing else makes sense for them to pursue.

They pursue those objectives because the ultimate ingress to safety is the control and influence of those who control access to resources, and indirectly through the control of those who control money because money can be used to control people who have access to resources.